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cristina
29 September 2010 @ 04:31 pm
One of the biggest keys to succeeding at breastfeeding is to set your head for a learning curve experience. Learning to breastfeed is no different than learning to swim, knit or sing: there may be bumps along the way, but keep your eye on the prize and before you know it, you’ll be doing great! Unfortunately, many new moms set themselves up for disappointment by expecting that breastfeeding will come “naturally” — “how hard can it be? Women have been doing it for millennia” –or they expect it to be painful and difficult because they have heard stories about how hard it can be. The truth is neither. The truth is that although breastfeeding is instinctive, it is a skill that both mother and baby have to learn and master. This is what we call the learning curve of breastfeeding and it usually takes about 4-6 weeks.

To use the sports analogy again, if you decided to take up running, you would expect to get sore muscles, but because you know that it’s part of the experience, you would take it in stride and not let it derail you. Unfortunately, because our culture fell off the breastfeeding wagon (don’t forget that only 20% our parents breastfed in the 60s-70s), we have lost a sense of what to expect and our definition of “normal” and “natural” has become warped. At the same time, targeted efforts to undermine breastfeeding have put roadblocks in the way of women succeeding. The unfortunate result for too many women is that their first race is uphill with hurdles, often depending on where you give birth or what part of the country you live in! So be gentle with yourself and your baby during this time—you both are learning a new skill and a new relationship. And really, 4-6 weeks is a small period of time compared with the lifetime of benefits for both of you!

Finally, don’t compare and despair: there are some women for whom breastfeeding comes as easy as golf comes to Tiger Woods. Whether by natural talent, or because they were lucky to have fewer breastfeeding booby traps™ in their way, these women had no problems breastfeeding and have difficulty understanding why others do. They (or their friends or doctors) may end up coming across as a bit insensitive or invalidating towards you in the process. Don’t let this get you off kilter! Most people have not stopped to consider all the cultural and institutional barriers to breastfeeding and, therefore, have contributed to blaming mothers unfairly. Best for Babes is working to educate family, friends and professionals, as well as removing those booby traps™, so that new moms are no longer thrown under the bus and breastfeeding is restored to the “normal” and “natural” experience that it was designed to be.

Here are our key evidence-based concepts to get you off to a great start:

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cristina
Statement 15 October 2009 - [Article here]

Following the publication of new research on risk factors involved in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and subsequent media coverage, UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Initiative has issued the following statement, the full version of which can be accessed by clicking the link at the bottom of the page.

The SWISS study, designed to investigate the factors associated with SIDS in 0-2 year-olds, draws a clear link between increased risk of SIDS and alcohol or drug use when co-sleeping with a baby, particularly on a sofa.

Much media coverage yesterday focused on the study’s statistic that 54 per cent of the infants in the study died whilst co-sleeping, without noting whether it was in a bed or on the sofa. In fact, the percentage of infants that died whilst sharing the parental bed was 38 per cent, which was the same as the percentage of infants that died in the cot.

The study, examining 80 SIDS infants and two control groups, one randomly selected, one of babies at high-risk of SIDS, showed that many of the deaths in a co-sleeping situation could be explained by “a significant multivariable interaction between co-sleeping and recent parental use of alcohol or drugs (31 per cent v 3 per cent random controls) and the increased proportion of SIDS infants who had coslept on a sofa (17 per cent v 1 per cent).” Other significant factors included pillow use, swaddling, smoking during pregnancy, whether the infant was preterm and whether the infant was in fair or poor health for the last sleep.

The authors conclude that “the major influences on risk were from factors amenable to change within the infant’s sleeping environment….Parents need to be advised never to put themselves in a situation where they might fall asleep with a young infant on a sofa. Parents also need to be reminded that they should never cosleep with an infant in any environment if they have consumed alcohol or drugs.”

In recognition of this, the UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Initiative has for some time been working to assist health professionals to discuss bed-sharing with parents so that risks can be identified and minimised, rather than attempting to promote restrictions which cannot be applied in parents’ real worlds.

A sample bed-sharing policy has been developed for hospitals and a leaflet for parents produced with the Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths (FSID). Both are designed to promote safety whilst protecting breastfeeding, by educating health professionals and parents on the benefits, contra-indications and safety issues surrounding this practice. UNICEF has also been urging NHS trusts to acknowledge the gap in health professional’s knowledge and provide training on all aspects of bed-sharing, including best practice for hospitals and how to communicate the key messages effectively to parents depending on their needs and circumstances.

Peter Fleming and Peter Blair, two of the authors of the study, have seen and agree with this statement.


Full UNICEF statement can be seen here.


ETA: HOW TO SLEEP SAFELY WITH YOUR BABY

 
 
 
cristina
19 December 2008 @ 02:23 pm


Awesome, awesome, awesome. Especially for you science geeks who like numbers and graphs and figures :P
 
 
Current Mood: geekygeeky
 
 
 
cristina
29 April 2008 @ 01:19 pm
i thought this was pretty awesome :)

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cristina
10 December 2007 @ 01:29 am
a friend of mine posted this a while ago, and it was just reposted in naturalbirth. i have loved it every time i've watched it :)

 
 
 
cristina
16 July 2007 @ 02:31 pm
this is not intended to deny or minimise in any way the shocking pain and harm of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM). but many people emphatically deny any similarity between Female Genital Mutilation and Male Genital Mutilation (MGM, circumcision).

FGMMGM
Cutting?YESYES
Of the genitals?YESYES
Of babies?YESYES
Of children?YESYES
Without consent?YESYES
At parents' behest?YESYES
Removing erogenous tissue?YESYES
Supposedly beneficial?YESYES
Justified by aesthetics?YESYES
Justified by supposed health benefits?YESYES
Justified by religion?YESYES
Justified by sexual effects?YESYES
Justified by custom?YESYES
Justified by conformity?YESYES
Effects minimised by its supporters?YESYES
Performed by its adult victims?YESYES
Extremely painful?YESYES
Can cause harm?YESYES
Very severe damage?USUALLYSOMETIMES
Can cause death?YESYES
Legal in Western countries?NOYES


http://www.circumstitions.com/FGMvsMGM.html
 
 
 
cristina
24 June 2007 @ 02:05 pm
doesn't apply to me, but i was definitely happy to see this! :)



On Wednesday, the New York State Senate passed the Expressing At Work Bill, meaning that the bill has now passed both houses of the state legislature and is expected to become law. (It had passed the Assembly a number of times in years past, but languished in the Senate until recently). For those who are interested, the text of the law is as follows:

Section 1. The labor law is amended by adding a new section 206-c to read as follows:
S 206-C. RIGHT OF NURSING MOTHERS TO EXPRESS BREAST MILK. AN EMPLOYER SHALL PROVIDE REASONABLE UNPAID BREAK TIME OR PERMIT AN EMPLOYEE TO USE PAID BREAK TIME OR MEAL TIME EACH DAY TO ALLOW AN EMPLOYEE TO EXPRESS BREAST MILK FOR HER NURSING CHILD FOR UP TO THREE YEARS FOLLOWING CHILD BIRTH. THE EMPLOYER SHALL MAKE REASONABLE EFFORTS TO PROVIDE A ROOM OR OTHER LOCATION, IN CLOSE PROXIMITY TO THE WORK AREA, WHERE AN EMPLOYEE CAN EXPRESS MILK IN PRIVACY. NO EMPLOYER SHALL DISCRIMINATE IN ANY WAY AGAINST AN EMPLOYEE WHO CHOOSES TO EXPRESS BREAST MILK IN THE WORK PLACE.
S 2. This act shall take effect immediately.
 
 
 
cristina
19 June 2007 @ 08:03 pm
People are illogical, unreasonable, and self-centered.
Love them anyway.
If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish ulterior motives.
Do good anyway.
If you are successful, you win false friends and true enemies.
Succeed anyway.
The good you do today will be forgotten tomorrow.
Do good anyway.
Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable.
Be honest and frank anyway.
The biggest men with the biggest ideas can be shot down by the smallest men with the smallest minds.
Think big anyway.
People favor underdogs, but follow only top dogs.
Fight for a few underdogs anyway.
What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight.
Build anyway.
People really need help but may attack you if you do help them.
Help people anyway.
Give the world the best you have and you'll get kicked in the teeth.
Give the world the best you have anyway.


http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/origin.html
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cristina
19 May 2007 @ 03:08 pm
PDF of an article from Men's Health magazine on circumcision.

It has pictures and descriptions of the process, as well as talking about the ethics of circumcision and the damage it can do. It's not pretty or fun to read, but it has a lot of information. It also talks about why circumcision became so common in the USA.


(stolen from krisw's journal)
 
 
 
cristina
DECIDING WHETHER OR NOT TO CIRCUMCISE YOUR BABY BOY
- Dr Sears -


This is a decision that many parents face. There are many misconceptions and out-of-date information that parents may read. Here is a summary of the pertinent issues that you should consider when making this decision.

Medical benefits - THERE ARE NONE! Do not circumcise your baby because you think there are some medical benefits. A recent review by the American Academy of Pediatrics looked at all the data from the past decades to see if there truly were any medical benefits. Their conclusion - NO. There are no significant medical benefits that make circumcision worth doing. Here are a few benefits that we used to think were true, and now know are not.

      Cleanliness - although it is true, a circumcised penis does not collect much white stuff underneath the foreskin like an intact    
      penis does, THIS IS NOT A MEDICAL BENEFIT. It is really just one less area to wash in the shower.

      Decreased risk of STD's - this was a myth that we now know is not true.

      Decreased risk of penile cancer - it used to be thought that circumcised men had a much lower chance of cancer of the penis. 
      We now know that this benefit is much smaller than previously thought. The AAP determined that this benefit is so tiny, it is not 
      worth circumcising for this reason. 

     Avoiding infections in the foreskin - it is true, occasionally intact foreskins get irritated. This is easily treated with warms soaks 
     and washing. Rarely, the irritated foreskin becomes infected. This requires antibiotics to clear up, but is easily treatable. Even if 
     this does happen once or twice in a person's life, it is not a reason to circumcise at birth.

     Avoiding the need to do it later on - very rarely, someone has a problem with recurrent infections in the foreskin that need 
     antibiotic treatment. Some of these men then need to be circumcised in an operating room under general anesthesia. This is 
     extremely rare, however, and is not a reason to circumcise everyone at birth. 

     Avoiding bladder infections - it used to thought that circumcised boys and men had a much lower chance of bladder infections. 
     The AAP now knows that this benefit is very small, and is only true for the first few years of life. After that, there is no difference in
     the number of bladder infections. Again, not a reason to circumcise.

THEREFORE, IF YOU DECIDE TO CIRCUMCISE YOUR CHILD, DO NOT DO SO BECAUSE YOU THINK THERE IS ANY MEDICAL BENEFIT.
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